Artist

Natalie Wood

Born and raised in Trinidad, Natalie obtained her studio training at Ontario College of Art and Design and went on to complete an MA in Art Education from the University of Toronto in 2000. Her works have been presented nationally and internationally in several group exhibitions (Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art 2007), International Art Fairs (Artist Project Toronto 2010, Nuit Blanche 2007, Toronto Alternative Art Fair International, 2006,), and film and video festivals (the New York Mix Film and Video Festival, Inside Out, Images, Pleasure Dome and Mpenzi Film and Video festival where she won the Audience Choice Award in 2006). She has had solo shows at ASpace Gallery windows, Zsa Zsa Gallery and following on residencies at the Spadina Museum House and at the Caribbean Contemporary Art Centre 7 in Trinidad. A recipient of numerous awards from the Toronto, Ontario and Canada Council for the Arts, she received the 2006 New Pioneers Award for contribution to the Arts in Toronto and was nominated for the 2006 K. M Hunter Interdisciplinary Arts Award for her web-based project Kinlinks which is online for viewing at www.kinlinks.net.

Videography

Blue

2018, 06:00 minutes, Colour, English

Time Will Come

2018, 06:00 minutes, Colour, English

Hangman

2016, 08:00 minutes, Colour, English

Touched by a Soucouyant

2015, 05:00 minutes, Colour, English

Bananagrams

2013, 27:05 minutes, Colour, English

Will

2011, 03:30 minutes, colour, English

The Bond Girl

2008, 04:45 minutes, colour, English

Daisy Redux: Daisy Gets a Divorce

2008, 06:00 minutes, colour, English

Call Me Daisy

2006, 03:00 minutes, colour, English

The Locks Narrative

2005, 10:00 minutes, colour, English

Medusa's Hats

2005, 03:00 minutes, colour

The Dozens

2004, 07:00 minutes, Colour, English

Enter, Hailey

2002, 08:00 minutes, colour, English

Critical Writing

Streaming Alterity
by Steph Rogerson. Border Crossings, May Spring 2012, v. 1, no. 122.
Everything new is becoming old: New Toronto Works short on innovation
by Peter Goddard. The Toronto Star, Mar. 11, 2005.